THINNING AND FINE HAIR IN INDIAN + SUB-CONTINENT WOMEN

Hair loss Solutions for THINNING AND FINE HAIR IN INDIAN + SUB-CONTINENT WOMEN

  

Women of Indian and sub-continent heritage are renowned for having luscious, long-thick hair. But we are noticing an increase in younger and older women from this region, with diminishing hair quality, texture and density of scalp hair, causing thinning scalp hair, receding hairlines. 

At Wigs of London, we specialise in toppers, mono-toppers and hair loss systems to disguise these symptoms. 

Sometimes dietary and religious observances may combine to gradually diminish the quality, texture and density of scalp hair for this group of women.

Some Sikh, Hindu and Jain diets may affect the hair: lacto-vegetarian or ‘fruitarian’ diets tend to be low in proteins or some essential nutrients – particularly Iron and Vitamin B12. 

The mineral Iron is arguably the most important nutrient to the body’s functioning. 

Avoiding prolonged sun exposure – common for many women of Indian and sub-continent heritage – enhanced by ‘full covering’ forms of dress common within Muslim practices, can lead to Vitamin D deficiency.

Chronic Vitamin D deficiency is linked to many health conditions. Vitamin D and Copper deficiency tend to go hand in hand; when one is low so is the other. 

Copper deficiency also hinders the deployment of iron by the red blood cells, resulting in the iron being accumulated (but unavailable) within the organs of the body. Because this stored iron cannot be utilised whilst the copper deficiency persists, symptoms of iron deficiency may present – despite an actual iron sufficiency.

The implication of the Vitamin D – Copper correlation in many sub-continent women, with Vitamin D deficiency may have a simultaneous but concealed Copper deficiency.

The various forms of hair loss experienced by sub-continent women is consistent with most other alopecia conditions seen throughout the world. ‘Pattern’ hair loss in women would conceptually tend to be of higher incidence and can differ slightly in presentation.

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